Meditations on the Scripture (Psalm 1)

Meditation

Meditation on Scripture consists of prayerfully reading and reflecting on the Scriptures as we grow to know and enjoy God in Christ.

·      Our aim in meditation is to hear, believe, and obey God’s Word so that we can increasingly reflect God’s character in our lives.

·      One way to meditate on the Scriptures is to read them out loud and to ask questions as we read.

·      E.g.,

o   Choose a verse, a paragraph, a story, and/or a chapter. Read it several times out loud to yourself.

o   Reflect on the passage by asking key questions:

§  What does this passage say?

§  What does this passage mean?

§  How does this passage apply to life today?

o   On the basis of your meditation, speak to God about what you are learning and hearing from the Scriptures. Acknowledge his greatness and beauty. Confess your sin and unbelief. Thank God for his work in your life. Speak to him about your questions, concerns, and needs.

·      David Helm’s book One to One Bible Reading: A Simple Guide for Every Christian is a useful and concise guide for reading and reflecting on the Scriptures. It gives two simple frameworks for Bible reading, and provides bible- reading questions for the main types of biblical literature. These sheets are available for free download here. You could use the “COMA questions for Hebrew wisdom literature and poetry” to reflect on the Psalms (See pages 8 & 9 of the pdf, or pages 90-91 of the book).

Each Sunday I will preach from a passage of Scripture; I will then post a short guide for meditation on that Scripture. You can use this guide for yourself, your family, and/or your small group. May we increasingly reflect God’s character in our lives as we hear, believe, and obey God’s Word. 

This Week’s Meditation

Text: Psalm 1

Main Point of the Sermon:

Meditation on Scripture leads to true spiritual growth.

Reflection on the text:

·      Read Psalm 1 several times with an attitude of prayer. If possible, read it in several different translations.

·      Ask questions:

o   What does it say?

o   What does it mean?

o   How does this passage apply to us today?

§  What does this passage teach us about who God is?

§  What does this passage teach us about who we are?

§  What does this passage teach us about what God expects from us?

·      Is there an example to follow?

·      Is there a command to obey?

·      Is there a promise to trust?

§  What does this passage teach us about who Jesus is and what he has done?

o   See the ““COMA questions for Hebrew wisdom literature and poetry” above for a set of questions related to context, observation, meaning, and application.

·      Speak to God about what you are hearing and learning from the Scriptures.

Readings

·      “A healthy church is a congregation that increasingly reflects God’s character as his character has been revealed in his Word.”[1]

·      “True spirituality consists in hearing, believing, and obeying God’s Word. That is why God’s Word is the source of the church’s life and health, and why pastors should preach expositionally.”[2]


[1] M. Dever, What is a Healthy Church? (Wheaton: Crossway, 2005), 40.

[2] B. Jamieson, Hearing God’s Word: Expositional Preaching, Healthy Church Study Guides (Wheaton: Crossway, 2012), Kindle loc. 192.